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US authorities identify 4 Chinese tourists killed in bus crash

(CNN)The four Chinese tourists killed in a bus crash in southern Utah have been identified, the Utah Highway Patrol said on Twitter.

Ling Geng, 68; Xiuyun Chen, 67; Zhang Caiyu, 62; and ZhongLiang Qiu, 65, all of Shanghai, died when the bus wrecked Friday on Utah Highway 12 near Bryce Canyon National Park, the UHP said.

Thirty people, including the driver, were on the bus when it “ran off the road and rolled into the guardrail,” the Garfield County Sheriff’s Office said in a statement.

Of the 22 people injured in the crash, 12 were still hospitalized Saturday, said Lance Madigan, a spokesman for Intermountain Healthcare.

    Some passengers suffered critical injuries during the crash. CNN has obscured parts of this image because the condition of the victims could not be verified.

    Madigan said 10 patients remain at Intermountain Dixie Regional hospital, five in critical condition and five in serious condition. Two patients in serious condition remain at Utah Valley Hospital, he said. The others were released.

    The National Transportation Safety Board said it sent a 10-person team to assist in the investigation.

    A student from Taiwan who attends Southern Utah University helped translate after the crash,

    reported CNN affiliate KSTU.

    “I got a call from the sheriff’s office that there is an emergency accident and, ‘I need somebody who can speak Chinese to translate for the tourists,'” Jason Chang said. “I know they cannot speak English, so I know they must be really panicked.”

    Chang told KSTU he spent hours at a hospital helping doctors and nurses communicate with the patients, then assisted law enforcement officers interviewing witnesses.

    “They (the bus crash victims) told me they never expected this kind of accident and they just don’t know what to do or how to react,” Chang said. “Some of them (were) really in pain.”

    Employees of the nearby Bryce Canyon Resort told CNN their manager was called to the crash scene to assist first responders with translating for the Chinese tour group. The manager is one of the few Chinese speakers in the area, the hotel staff said.

    The bus crashed on Utah Highway 12, a few miles west of Bryce Canyon National Park. CNN obscured parts of this image, as the condition of the victims could not be verified.

    The Chinese Embassy in Washington said it has sent officials to the area to assist the victims.

    “We are saddened to hear about the accident in Utah involving a bus carrying Chinese tourists. We are thankful to authorities in Utah for their assistance. The Embassy has initiated its emergency protocols, sent personnel to the area, and will assist the victims as needed,”

    the embassy tweeted.

    Utah Gov. Gary Herbert thanked first responders for their work and sent a message to the victim’s families.

    “My heart sank when I heard the news that a tour bus crashed near Bryce Canyon. I grieve with all who lost loved ones in this crash and I’m grateful for the quick work of first responders, as well as all those who are volunteering to act as translators,” he

    tweeted.

      The wreck was about 7 miles northwest of the entrance of the Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is about 250 miles south of Salt Lake City and just over 40 miles north of the Utah-Arizona border.

      Utah’s Highway 12 is considered one of the most varied and scenic drives in the country. It connects a number of national and state parks, including Bryce Canyon National Park and Red Canyon on the Dixie National Forest.

      CNN’s Nicole Chavez, Hollie Silverman, Melissa Alonso, Carma Hassan and Rebekah Riess contributed to this report.

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      21-year-old worked 32 hours alone at a hotel during a flood. Guests say he’s a hero

      (CNN)When Satchel Smith’s father dropped him off for his shift at Homewood Suites in Beaumont, Texas, he expected the day to be like any other: He’d start at 3 p.m. and leave around 11 p.m. that night.

      That was until

      Tropical Storm-turned-Depression Imelda

      unleashed torrential flooding that trapped him and 90 other guests inside the hotel.

      For 32 hours, beginning Wednesday afternoon, the 21-year-old was the hotel’s only employee. But to the guests who relied on him for nearly two days, he’s a hero.

      Angela Chandler, a hotel guest, praised Smith’s composure in a post on Facebook, where it’s been shared more than 13,000 times. While flooded roads kept his co-workers from getting to work, she wrote, Smith served guests alone.

        “He has manned the phones, answered each of our questions, ensured that we have had a hot cup of coffee or tea, and helped serve us a hot breakfast,” Chandler wrote. “He has handled this situation with grace, kindness, and a beautiful smile on his face.”

        For someone trapped at work, he sure seemed cheerful. But privately, the Lamar University track and field star felt overwhelmed, he told CNN.

        “It was pretty intense,” he said.

        Typically positioned behind the front desk, he was now the hotel’s chef, maintenance man, room service attendant and any other vacant position that needed filling, even when his experience was lacking.

        “I’d never worked in a kitchen,” he admitted. “I’m not really a good cook.”

        Homewood Suites in Beaumont avoided the worst of the storm, but Smith worked alone for four shifts straight. He kept working even after a co-worker made it in two days later.

        But he resolved to cook anyway. A guest stepped in to help serve breakfast, and a few others joined them to prepare dinner — a simple chicken pasta with garlic bread. He was pleasantly surprised that it tasted good, he said.

        “Everyone seemed pretty thankful for it,” he said. “They said it was pretty satisfying.”

        Outside, the highways were closed and drivers were stuck in their cars, so Smith and the guests braved the flood to distribute food and water to stalled truckers. After spending so much time together, the group was bound to band together, he said.

        “The guests were very helpful,” he said. “It was basically like a big family.”

        Finally, after a marathon shift and glowing reviews from guests, Smith’s co-worker made it into work Friday morning. He stayed around for a few hours to help her out, took a brief nap, then woke up and went right back to work until his family could safely drive to pick him up.

          The hotel avoided the worst of the storm, with flooding limited to the parking lot, but his car wasn’t so lucky. It’s the second time a storm’s totaled one of his cars after

          Hurricane Harvey hit in 2017

          . But he’s managed to find the good in it all: His family’s home didn’t flood.

          “Everything happens for a reason,” he said.

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          Liverpool extends perfect Premier League start

          (CNN)Liverpool extended its 100% domestic record this season with a tough 2-1 victory against Frank Lampard’s Chelsea.

          First-half goals from Trent Alexander-Arnold and Roberto Firmino were enough to clinch all three points in an entertaining match at Stamford Bridge, with N’Golo Kante scoring the host’s only goal of the game.

          It was the first time

          since 2016

          that the Reds have won away to Chelsea and Sunday’s win keeps Jurgen Klopp’s side five points clear at the top of the English Premier League.

          Meanwhile, defeat leaves the west London club in the bottom half of the table.

            Liverpool has a poor record away to the league’s so-called top six clubs and it was made to work very hard for its sixth consecutive win of the season.

            Chelsea’s young side threatened on a number of occasions but the game’s big moments fell in favor of the reigning European Champion.

            “Massive for us. We have come here in good form, tried to execute the game plan and bounced back from a set back in midweek and shown we are a good side,” Alexander-Arnold told Sky Sports, referring to his side’s

            midweek defeat

            in the Champions League.

            “You can’t expect to come here and have it your own way. They are a proud side and were going to come out fighting. The last 25-30 mins were really tough.”

            Trent Alexander-Arnold scores Liverpool's wonderful first goal at Stamford Bridge.

            Set-piece success

            Liverpool opened the scoring through a wonderful Alexander-Arnold strike after he made the most of a free-kick on the edge of the penalty box. The rehearsed routine saw Mohamed Salah rework the angle of the set-piece, with the England international sending the ball flying into the top corner of the net.

            Cesar Azpilicueta thought he had equalized for Chelsea shortly after but the goal was eventually ruled out by VAR — replays showed Mason Mount had strayed fractionally offside in the buildup.

            To make matters worse for Chelsea, Liverpool doubled its lead just moments after play restarted.

            In many ways, the second goal bore the hallmarks of the first, only this time it was left to Alexander-Arnold to rework the angle of a wide free-kick which allowed Andy Robertson to tee up an unmarked Roberto Firmino for a header.

            Such routines should not come as a surprise. Liverpool has now scored 34 goals from set-piece situations since the beginning of last season — seven more than any other EPL team.

            “We work on set pieces. All the things we do in training I love to see on the pitch. Big fight from everybody,” Klopp told Sky Sports after the match.

            Tammy Abraham has his shot saved by Liverpool goalkeeper Adrian in the first-half.

            Chelsea unfortunate

            Chelsea was not without its chances though.

            In-form striker Tammy Abraham missed a golden opportunity in the first half when one-on-one with goalkeeper Adrian and Lampard’s young side continued to test Liverpool’s resolve.

            Perhaps surprisingly, it was Kante who supplied the hosts with the clinical finishing it lacked for much of the match.

            The Frenchman finished off a wonderful run to set up a tense final 20 minutes for the traveling fans where Chelsea perhaps should have found the equalizer.

            The result means Lampard is still waiting for a home win as Chelsea boss but the former England international was encouraged by the way his side played at times.

            “Performance-wise we were the better team. We had more energy in our game, character and spirit. That’s why the crowd applauded at the end. Let’s take this forward,” he told Sky Sports.

            EPL action

              Elsewhere, Manchester United suffered defeat away to West Ham United. Goals from Andriy Yarmolenko and Aaron Cresswell were enough to see off a meek display from Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side.

              Meanwhile, 10-man Arsenal completed a remarkable comeback against Aston Villa, twice coming from behind to win 3-2.

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              More than 90 heads of state are descending on New York City. Here’s what to watch for

              New York (CNN)It sounds like a digestive tract flareup. But that’s just how insiders pronounce the acronym for the annual United Nations General Assembly taking place this week: UNGA (“UNG-gah”). And when it ends, global leaders and a cast of thousands will indeed feel like taking some kind of medication.

              For just one September week each year, everyone from kings, presidents and prime ministers on down to food tasters fly in to New York City and jam into the United Nations headquarters, in what has become a cliched joke about “

              diplomatic speed dating

              .” But there’s nothing funny about the top priority at this 74th year of UNGA year, which is

              the world’s climate emergency.

              The United Nations Climate Summit

              The UN has arranged

              a special Climate Action summit

              on Monday September 23, before the formal speeches given by heads of state and governments that normally draw the most attention. Breaking with tradition,

              UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres

              has told country leaders not to come to the podium Monday without “concrete and transformative plans” to halt rising global temperatures, achieve carbon neutrality and cut carbon emissions by 45 percent. VIPs with proposals have been told they have just three minutes to speak.

                How concrete the results of the summit will actually be is unclear. The UN doesn’t have a global climate army to roam the planet stopping pollution, so it’s up to the 193 nations of the UN to take action. What the UN will actually do is what some feel the organization sadly does best: collecting the speeches and other environmental brainstorms in a report.

                The aim is to pressure world leaders to do more, as the climate emergency worsens. Some have made it a top priority — German Chancellor

                Angela Merkel

                will be in town for the climate summit, even though she’s skipping the rest of the week. In contrast, US President Donald Trump will be in town, but he’s skipping the climate summit — instead

                hosting a session on religious persecution

                in the same building. Trump has previously avoided international meetings on climate.

                Let the General Debate begin

                The so-called “general debate” begins on Tuesday September 24, and the first country to speak is Brazil, by longstanding tradition. It’ll be the debut UNGA appearance of Brazilian leader Jair Bolsonaro, who recently vowed to attend even if in a wheelchair, following recent surgery. Expect fireworks: After high global concern over

                massive fires and deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon

                , the

                pro-business Bolsonaro

                is likely to take climate advocates head-on. He has already promised a “speech that is different from those that came before”.

                Following him will be Donald Trump, who has stuck to the teleprompter previously, and last year

                drew laughter from delegates

                while praising his own administration.

                The volume of Trump’s appearances and his unpredictability have dominated the past two years of Trump at the General Assembly. Last year, he shocked the visiting Chinese Foreign Minister

                by accusing Beijing of interfering in US elections

                while both men sat at the Security Council table.

                Trump was also the first US President to enter the building and take just a few steps before stopping in front of cameras and shouting reporters, to answer hot topic questions for three days. “He completely sucked the oxygen out of UNGA,” Richard Gowan, UN Director at the International Crisis Center says.

                The elephant in the secretariat

                This year,

                a mysterious attack on Saudi oil fields

                has provided some late drama to UNGA, as US officials point the finger at Iran, despite

                its denials

                and

                claims of responsibility by Houthi rebels

                in Yemen. The US, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Yemen and other Middle East players will all be under one roof for days. Some can’t stray too far. Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif has been slapped by movement restrictions from the US, which confine him to a small zone near the UN headquarters.

                A senior UN official stated, “tensions in the Gulf are going to be the backdrop to a lot of events and meetings.” Which leads us to the biggest question on the eve of UNGA: Will President Trump meet Iranian President Rouhani?

                Saudi Arabia has a great deal more to lose from a war than Iran does

                ‎Nothing is planned between the two leaders, though both will be in the UN building amid the parade of delegations. The threats and rhetoric lobbed by both sides have been fierce. The US imposed more sanctions on Iran on Friday before the high-level week begins, and the Iranians say they don’t need to talk.

                It looks like “a zero chance for a meeting,” says Gowan. “Instead of a diplomatic breakthrough, we’re likely to see a war of words.” The UN is meant to be a neutral ground for dueling sides to have dialogue, and chance face-to-face encounters are exactly what this international forum is good for. In 2000, then-US President Clinton and then Cuban President Fidel Castro suddenly stopped briefly for each other in a hallway, when relations between the nations were running cold. There is

                still a debate whether a handshake took place

                .

                Who’s coming to UNGA?

                As of Friday, 91 heads of state had committed to attend. French President Macron will be in New York offering an expanded French leadership role as a global mediator, as the Trump administration pulls the US back from international forums.

                ‎With

                significant angst at home

                over the UK’s planned withdrawal from Europe, Boris Johnson will make his first UNGA appearance in his role as prime minister. Brexit talks are scheduled with Ireland’s leader and others.

                And Indian leader Narendra Modi and Pakistan’s leader Imran Khan are both attending and speaking in the General Assembly. No talks are scheduled between them for now, as tensions remain high over

                India’s treatment of Kashmir,

                a disputed territory.

                And of fresh interest to American audiences will be Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, who debuts at UNGA right in the middle of a growing controversy: The US Congress wants to know if

                Trump pressured Zelensky to investigate Joe Biden’s son

                , who had business ties in the country. Biden, of course, is one of the main contenders for the US Democratic primary and could end up challenging Trump for the presidency next year.

                Pelosi: Trump administration 'entering a grave new chapter of lawlessness' if it doesn't turn over whistleblower complaint

                There are also UN meetings big and small on Libya, Yemen, Somalia, Sudan, and Myanmar. Apart from marathon hours of speeches, consider this: 630 meetings have been requested. The UN defines a meeting as a gathering of 15 or more people held within the UN for a maximum of three hours.

                There are “no less challenges than last year” affecting geopolitics around the world, said British UN Ambassador Karen Pierce. Expect demonstrators near the UN all day — though the targets of their anger may not even see them through their tinted limousine windows as they rush to the UN, sirens sometimes wailing.

                The list of leaders who will not appear this year is also interesting: Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese leader Xi Jinping rarely attend, and will not be present this year. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanayhu has canceled,

                amid a post-election muddle

                back home. Netanyahu, a former UN Ambassador, relishes his General Assembly speeches — often with props of charts and diagrams — and he has previously made for must-see TV in between lengthy boring speeches by others.

                Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had been listed as a speaker, but is no longer coming in the wake of

                multiple revelations of black- and brownface photos

                that surfaced from his past, just before national elections.

                President Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela has sent his regards but will not leave his turmoil-filled nation. His rival for the Venezuelan presidency — National Assembly leader Juan Guaido, whose presidential authority has been acknowledged by more than 50 countries, including the US — is unlikely to show but representatives will push the UN for future recognition of Guaido’s claim to power.

                Although the immediate premises of the United Nations are international ground, the United States is still the host. According to the “host country” agreement, visitors traveling for official UN business are not supposed to be barred, and there was once a time when the US would impose a generous 25-mile radius cordon on international visitors it didn’t like.

                  But this year, the US is not holding back. In addition to the movement restrictions on Iran’s Zarif, two Cuban diplomats living in New York who had planned to participate in UNGA were ordered expelled by the Trump administration, in a surprise Thursday announcement. And the remaining diplomats at the Cuban mission face the toughest restrictions among all countries: They’re not allowed to leave the narrow island of Manhattan.

                  And with all the traffic and security blockades, New Yorkers and tourists ‎too may feel no one can get off the island during this madhouse week.

                  CNN’s Elizabeth Joseph and Caitlin Hu in New York and Taylor Barnes in Atlanta contributed to this report.

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                  Trump and Modi share stage at ‘Howdy, Modi!’ rally in Texas

                  Today, India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be joined onstage at Houston’s NRG Arena by President Trump for a rally that is meant to celebrate the growing ties between India, the world’s largest democracy and the US, the world’s most powerful one.

                  But deep in the heart of Texas, not all of us are thrilled to see Modi and Trump in our backyard.

                  Both leaders have stoked divisions within their respective countries, and enacted troubling policies that chip away at democracy. And as tempting as it might be to celebrate “Howdy Modi” as a moment for the Indian American community to be seen, heard and recognized as a rising political force in the US, we’re worried that it comes at a cost that is far too high.

                  We can’t afford to ignore the pernicious impact that President Trump’s words and policies have had on immigrants and communities of color.

                  As native Houstonians of South Asian descent, there is a huge sense of pride in what our community has been able to accomplish. From CEOs to engineers, astronauts, artists, and taxi drivers, we have firmly established our roots in all facets of this country. Houston has afforded us the opportunity to thrive and succeed. With success, however, comes a responsibility to give back. It also means using our voices to speak out in the face of injustice, whether it’s the detention of migrant children in our own state or the lack of basic rights ethnic and religious minorities have in our ancestral country.

                  Just a snapshot of what’s been going on with Kashmir:

                  • India revoked Kashmir’s special status last month, and several thousand Kashmiris, including politicians and activists, have been detained, according to government sources who spoke to AFP on the condition of anonymity.
                  • Modi says that the changes will eventually help stimulate the region’s economy, but that seems to be a flimsy explanation.
                  • There are plenty of states in India with higher unemployment and poverty rates that have not been placed under such draconian restrictions. It’s hard not to view this as part of a wider Hindu nationalist agenda.
                  • More importantly, this action in Kashmir took place without diplomacy and dialogue. Tensions between Hindus and Muslims have simmered for decades, and while the region has struggled with economic stagnation, unilaterally shutting down the region without input from the people who live there is the antithesis of democracy.

                  And that is the lens by which we view this situation. We are not here to take sides between Hindus or Muslims, India or Pakistan, or any other groups.

                  We must judge what’s going on by the benchmarks of democracy, and question whether the government is acting for, of, and by the people. With the communications blackout still in effect, the only voice emerging from the region is that of the Indian government.

                  As Americans, we are allowed to criticize our leaders and protest, while the free press can hold our government accountable. But none of that is currently available in Kashmir. Peace requires hard work finding common ground and striking compromises, and Modi does not appear to be interested in doing that.

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                  Hundreds mourn ‘dead’ glacier at funeral in Switzerland

                  A woman takes part in a ceremony to mark the

                  (CNN)Hundreds of people held a funeral and paid respects to a Swiss glacier that is disappearing as temperatures climb.

                  Pizol glacier in the Glarus Alps, eastern Switzerland, stands at an altitude of about 2,700 meters, and has lost 80-90% of its volume since 2006, leaving behind 26,000 square meters of ice — less than four football fields — said Matthias Huss, a glacier specialist at ETH Zurich university.

                  The glacier, which has been monitored since 1893, will be the first to be taken off the Swiss glacier surveillance network, according to Huss.

                  Around 250 people gathered Sunday to hike up to the glacier, where a local priest gave a speech to commemorate the retreating ice, said Alessandra Degiacomi, coordinator of the Swiss Association for Climate Protection and organizer of the funeral march.

                    Experts say the Pizol glacier has effectively disappeared.

                    “Pizol glacier has disappeared. There will be some snow left, but the glacier is no more,” Huss told CNN.

                    “There are several small pieces of ice lying around, but these pieces are increasingly being covered by rock debris from the mountain. But given what is left of it, we will no longer term it a glacier in scientific terms,” Huss added.

                    14 easy product swaps to help you live a more climate-conscious life

                    “80% of the glaciers in Switzerland are more or less the same size as Pizol,” Degiacomi told CNN.

                    “If Pizol goes, this is a warning sign. This is what is going to happen if we don’t change something about our behavior,” she added.

                    Degiacomi told CNN that the Swiss Association for Climate Protection had obtained 120,000 signatures — above the 100,000 required — needed to launch a popular initiative demanding that Switzerland reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050.

                    “We want to have a CO2 neutral Switzerland from 2050,” Degiacomi told CNN. “We want to decarbonize the country.”

                      In July, scientists memorialized the demise of Okjökull, the first

                      Icelandic glacier lost

                      to climate change, with a plaque.

                      A study released in June warned that

                      Himalayan glaciers are melting at a dramatic rate

                      — losing almost half a meter of ice each year since the start of this century due to global warming.

                      CNN’s Isabelle Gerretsen and Allen Kim contributed to this report.

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                      Modi speaks at rally in Texas with Trump set to appear

                      Today, India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be joined onstage at Houston’s NRG Arena by President Trump for a rally that is meant to celebrate the growing ties between India, the world’s largest democracy and the US, the world’s most powerful one.

                      But deep in the heart of Texas, not all of us are thrilled to see Modi and Trump in our backyard.

                      Both leaders have stoked divisions within their respective countries, and enacted troubling policies that chip away at democracy. And as tempting as it might be to celebrate “Howdy Modi” as a moment for the Indian American community to be seen, heard and recognized as a rising political force in the US, we’re worried that it comes at a cost that is far too high.

                      We can’t afford to ignore the pernicious impact that President Trump’s words and policies have had on immigrants and communities of color.

                      As native Houstonians of South Asian descent, there is a huge sense of pride in what our community has been able to accomplish. From CEOs to engineers, astronauts, artists, and taxi drivers, we have firmly established our roots in all facets of this country. Houston has afforded us the opportunity to thrive and succeed. With success, however, comes a responsibility to give back. It also means using our voices to speak out in the face of injustice, whether it’s the detention of migrant children in our own state or the lack of basic rights ethnic and religious minorities have in our ancestral country.

                      Just a snapshot of what’s been going on with Kashmir:

                      • India revoked Kashmir’s special status last month, and several thousand Kashmiris, including politicians and activists, have been detained, according to government sources who spoke to AFP on the condition of anonymity.
                      • Modi says that the changes will eventually help stimulate the region’s economy, but that seems to be a flimsy explanation.
                      • There are plenty of states in India with higher unemployment and poverty rates that have not been placed under such draconian restrictions. It’s hard not to view this as part of a wider Hindu nationalist agenda.
                      • More importantly, this action in Kashmir took place without diplomacy and dialogue. Tensions between Hindus and Muslims have simmered for decades, and while the region has struggled with economic stagnation, unilaterally shutting down the region without input from the people who live there is the antithesis of democracy.

                      And that is the lens by which we view this situation. We are not here to take sides between Hindus or Muslims, India or Pakistan, or any other groups.

                      We must judge what’s going on by the benchmarks of democracy, and question whether the government is acting for, of, and by the people. With the communications blackout still in effect, the only voice emerging from the region is that of the Indian government.

                      As Americans, we are allowed to criticize our leaders and protest, while the free press can hold our government accountable. But none of that is currently available in Kashmir. Peace requires hard work finding common ground and striking compromises, and Modi does not appear to be interested in doing that.

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                      Trump: I’m ‘flexible’ but no, I’m not meeting Iran at UN

                      Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump said Sunday he does not intend to meet with Iran at the upcoming UN General Assembly, days after Iran denied involvement in an attack on Saudi oil facilities and the US announced new sanctions against the longtime US foe.

                      “Nothing’s ever off the table completely, but I have no intention of meeting with Iran, and that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen. I’m a very flexible person,” Trump told reporters at the White House.

                      The United Nations’ annual gathering of world leaders is taking place in the wake of the

                      attack on Saudi oil facilities

                       that Yemen-based Houthi rebels, locked in an ongoing war with Saudi Arabia and its allies for control of the country, say they carried out. The strikes hit the world’s largest oil processing plant and an oil field and sent global oil prices soaring. Iran has denied responsibility, but the Trump administration insists Iran is to blame.

                      Trump heads to the UN focused on Iran and his political base

                      Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNN’s Jake Tapper on “State of the Union” Sunday that Trump has always left the door open for a meeting with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, but said a meeting between the two world leaders is “highly unlikely given the current circumstances.”

                        Trump and his senior officials

                        head to the UNGA this week focused on a narrow agenda

                        that reflects domestic political concerns and the foreign policy challenge posed by Iran. While Trump and his administration have been openly skeptical of the value of international organizations and the UN in particular, this year they will be focused on lobbying the world community to join their push to bring Iran under control.

                        Mnuchin said Sunday that Iran “will be a major topic for the President” at the UN gathering.

                        Trump announced Friday he had applied new sanctions on two pillars of the Iranian economy, the country’s central bank and its sovereign wealth fund. The Pentagon announced the same day it would send additional troops along with enhanced air and missile defense systems to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

                        The Trump administration’s focus, the Treasury secretary said, is now on those who violate the Iran sanctions and issuing sanctions on third parties where they see violations. He told Tapper the maximum pressure campaign on Iran is working.

                        “We have cut off almost all the money to Iran,” Mnuchin said. “I think you see Iran acting in desperation, attacking its neighbors. This is really unprecedented in that sense.”

                          Earlier this month, prior to the most recent sanctions against Iran, Mnuchin and

                          Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Trump was willing to meet with Rouhani

                          at the UN assembly, with “

                          no pre-conditions

                          .”

                          “I think you know we’ve done more sanctions on Iran than anybody. And it’s absolutely working. Now, the President has made clear he is happy to take a meeting with no pre-conditions, but we are maintaining the maximum pressure campaign,” Mnuchin said at the time.

                          CNN’s Jason Hoffman and Nicole Gaouette contributed to this report.

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                          Vettel’s first Grand Prix win of season angers Ferrari teammate

                          (CNN)Sebastian Vettel won his first Grand Prix of the season in Singapore on Sunday, but his victory was not without controversy.

                          The German, who had started in third, benefited from a strange Ferrari strategy which saw him leapfrog teammate Charles Leclerc, who had begun in pole position.

                          The move angered the 21-year-old — and he made his feelings known.

                          “I don’t understand the undercut at all. But we discuss it later,” Leclerc fired over the team radio.

                            The issue concerned the team’s decision to pit Vettel early, which allowed him to get ahead of his teammate as Leclerc emerged from a pit stop a lap later.

                            For Vettel, though, it was a much needed win after a difficult year for the four-time world champion who has been plagued with bad luck and prone to sloppy mistakes.

                            “I’m very happy. It was a great race. First of all big congratulations to the team,” said Vettel, who said he was surprised to come out ahead of the field.

                            “The start of the season has been difficult for us, then we started to come alive and I’m really proud of everyone’s work back home.”

                            Sebastian Vettel celebrates winning the race.

                            Ferrari tension

                            Despite the race doing no favors for team cohesion, Ferrari can enjoy its first one-two since 2017.

                            There were, however, no huge celebrations between its two drivers after the race with Leclerc still visibly frustrated with how it ended.

                            The young driver managed to keep his emotions in check during the podium ceremony and offered a pragmatic answer to the world’s media.

                            “We came here hoping for a podium and came away with a one-two,” said Leclerc.

                            “I’m disappointed for me but I will come back stronger.

                            “The strategy was fixed at the beginning (and) I stuck to the plan, the most important (thing) was that we finished one-two.”

                            Title race

                              Red Bull’s Max Verstappen finished third ahead of Lewis Hamilton but the Briton is still clear at the

                              top of the title race

                              with 296 points. Valtteri Bottas is his closest rival, albeit 65 points behind.

                              Leclerc and Verstappen are both tied on points in third, 32 points further adrift.

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                              Schiff: Impeachment may be ‘only remedy’ to whistleblower scandal

                              Washington (CNN)House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff said Sunday that impeachment “may be the only remedy” to President Donald Trump’s refusal to make public a whistleblower complaint and transcript of a phone conversation he had with Ukraine’s president.

                              “If the President is essentially withholding military aid at the same time that he is trying to browbeat a foreign leader into doing something illicit that is providing dirt on his opponent during a presidential campaign, then that may be the only remedy that is coequal to the evil that conduct represents,” the California Democrat told CNN’s Jake Tapper on “State of the Union,” stopping short of

                              calling on Congress to immediately launch

                              proceedings.

                              Biden: Trump abusing his power in Ukraine call to 'smear me' and should be investigated

                              As previously reported by CNN, a person familiar with the situation said

                              Trump pressed Ukrainian President Vologymyr Zelensky

                              in a July 25 phone call to investigate former

                              Vice President Joe Biden’s son, Hunter

                              . That call was also

                              part of a whistleblower complaint

                              submitted to the Intelligence Community Inspector General, another person familiar with the situation told CNN. Biden has accused the President of abusing his power to “smear” him, while Trump has branded criticism of the call a “Ukranian Witch Hunt.”

                              There is no evidence of wrongdoing by either Joe or Hunter Biden.

                                Schiff, who has

                                so far resisted joining other Democrats

                                in calling for impeachment, told Tapper he has been “very reluctant” to push for proceedings against the President because he sees it as a “remedy of last resort,” but also said Sunday that the President doesn’t have the authority “to engage in underhanded discussions.” The chairman’s apparent edging toward impeachment follows pressure from others in his party — including from Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez — to start proceedings.

                                On Friday, Warren, who is vying for her party’s presidential nomination, tweeted that “Congress is complicit” in failing to start impeachment proceedings against Trump after news broke that he had allegedly pressured Zelensky to investigate Hunter Biden.

                                Echoing Warren’s sentiments, Ocasio-Cortez suggested in a tweet on Saturday that her party’s “refusal to impeach” Trump was an even bigger scandal than what she said was the President’s “lawbreaking behavior.”

                                Whistleblower timeline: Team Trump contacts and Ukraine

                                Asked by Tapper Sunday about Trump keeping conversations with foreign leaders private, Schiff said: “Well not if those conversations involve potential corruption or criminality or leverage being used for political advantage against our nation’s interest.”

                                “This would be, I think, the most profound violation of the presidential oath of office, certainly during this presidency, which says a lot, but perhaps during just about any presidency. There is no privilege that covers corruption. There is no privilege to engage in underhanded discussions,” he said, adding that he’s not certain that the call is the subject of the complaint.

                                Earlier Sunday, Trump defended his controversial phone call with Zelensky and again slammed the whistleblower who filed a complaint about it last month.

                                “We had a great conversation. The conversation I had was largely congratulatory, was largely corruption — all of the corruption taking place, was largely the fact that we don’t want our people like Vice President Biden and his son (adding to the corruption),” Trump told reporters as he left the White House.

                                  The President described the conversation as “warm and friendly” and repeatedly urged reporters to look instead at Biden and Democrats, who he said — without providing evidence — have “done some very bad things.”

                                  Ukrainian Foreign Minister Vadym Prystaiko told reporters on Saturday that he didn’t think Trump had tried pressuring Zelensky during the July call, but stopped short of saying the subject of Biden’s son wasn’t raised.

                                  CNN’s Sarah Westwood and Caroline Kelly contributed to this report.